Because I could not stop for Death

B
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The Carriage held but just Ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove – He knew no haste
And I had put away
My labor and my leisure too,
For His Civility.

We passed the School, where Children strove
At Recess – in the Ring –
We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain –
We passed the Setting Sun

Or rather – He passed Us –
The Dews drew quivering and Chill –
For only Gossamer, my Gown –
My Tippet – only Tulle –

We paused before a House that seemed
A Swelling of the Ground –
The Roof was scarcely visible –
The Cornice – in the Ground,

Since then 'tis Centuries and yet
Feels shorter than the Day
I first surmised the Horses' Heads
Were toward Eternity.
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15-02-2024 18:04:09
The final lines convey the paradoxical nature of time, as the speaker feels that the journey with Death has been shorter than the day they first realized the horses were heading toward eternity. The poem is filled with a sense of resignation and acceptance, as the speaker contemplates the inevitability of death and the passage of time.

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