The Song of Wandering Aengus

T
I went out to the hazel wood,
Because a fire was in my head,
And cut and peeled a hazel wand,
And hooked a berry to a thread;
And when white moths were on the wing,
And moth-like stars were flickering out,
I dropped the berry in a stream
And caught a little silver trout.

When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire a-flame,
But something rustled on the floor,
And someone called me by my name:
It had become a glimmering girl
With apple blossom in her hair
Who called me by my name and ran
And faded through the brightening air.

Though I am old with wandering
Through hollow lands and hilly lands,
I will find out where she has gone,
And kiss her lips and take her hands;
And walk among long dappled grass,
And pluck till time and times are done,
The silver apples of the moon,
The golden apples of the sun.
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14-02-2024 15:07:31
This poem by William Butler Yeats takes the reader on a mystical journey through nature and the realms of imagination. The hazel wood becomes a place of enchantment and transformation, symbolizing the speaker's desire to escape from reality and find solace in the magical realm of the mind.
14-02-2024 15:08:24
The vivid imagery of the poem, from the flickering moths to the silver trout, creates a sense of otherworldliness and ethereal beauty. The description of the glimmering girl with apple blossoms in her hair adds to the enchanting atmosphere, leaving the reader captivated by the speaker's encounter with this mysterious figure.

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