At the Edge of Time

A
The stems of  the sun bent over the eye
The sleeping man
The whole of  the earth
And this head heavy with fear
In the night
This complete hole
Vast
And even so streaming with water
The noise
The peals of  little bells mingled with the
Clinking of glasses
And bursts of laughter
The head moves
On the carpet the body shifts
And turns over the warm spot
At the slipping feet of  the animal
It’s that they’re waiting
For the summons of the shock
And the signal of  the eyelid
The ray relaxes
Sleep
Light
And what is left shines at the edge of  the white rock
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