O Heart Uncovered

O
We lived in province snow range
and something that we uncover
is like living
in one Arizona room
when we discover all we owe
to darkness
we never really know.

Tomorrow is the national holiday for independence—
no more left.
For the first time
we see the mountains
with snow on them pulling away
from the mountains and clouds.
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