The Fountain

T
My dear, your eyes are weary;
Rest them a little while.
Assume the languid posture
Of pleasure mixed with guile.
Outside the talkative fountain
Continues night and day
Repeating my warm passion
In whatever it has to say.

The sheer luminous gown
The fountain wears
Where Phoebe’s very own
Color appears
Falls like a summer rain
Or shawl of tears.

Thus your soul ignited
By pleasure’s lusts and needs
Sprays into heaven’s reaches
And dreams of fiery deeds.
Then it brims over, dying,
And languorous, apart,
Drains down some slope and enters
The dark well of my heart.

The sheer luminous gown
The fountain wears
Where Phoebe’s very own
Color appears
Falls like a summer rain
Or shawl of tears.

O you, whom night enhances,
How sweet here at your breasts
To hear the eternal sadness
Of water that never rests.
O moon, o singing fountain,
O leaf-thronged night above,
You are the faultless mirrors
Of my sweet, bitter love.

The sheer luminous gown
The fountain wears
Where Phoebe’s very own
Color appears
Falls like a summer rain
Or shawl of tears.

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15-02-2024 15:39:44
The speaker addresses their beloved, urging them to rest their weary eyes and assume a posture of pleasure mixed with guile. The talkative fountain outside becomes a symbol of the speaker's passion, repeating their warm feelings in its constant flow.
15-02-2024 15:40:31
The speaker's soul, ignited by pleasure's lusts and needs, sprays into heaven's reaches and dreams of fiery deeds. This imagery conveys the intensity of their passion and desire for their beloved.

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