Th’ Dog Dreamers

T
Suddenly,
A mean-mouthed pack of dogs
Came out of stage left
Moving across America
In rapacious slow motion
Running funny, they said.
And how they appeared and disappeared
Didn’t help, either.
One was a stone, stoic.

The shadow-cloud dog-spectre
Clearly appeared to float,
Propelled forward
Ever so slowly—
Undulating but ever so slightly,
As blithely
As the rhythm of a sigh.
Th’ more nearer dog
Was transparent,
Just hovered
And cast no shadow whatsoever.
You could see the mountains
And the horizon right through him.

The third dog-thing
Wore zoot suit pants
And shades—tea-timers
To hide the white of his red eyes

It appeared
And spoke to the house
With the tile roof.

I turned and looked away—
My mouth agape
Wondering if I could even scream.
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