Sir John Suckling

S
Sir John Suckling
from A Ballad Upon A Wedding
I tell thee, Dick, where I have been,
Where I the rarest things have seen;
Oh, things without compare!
Such sights again cannot be found
In any place on English ground,
Be it at wake, or fair.

At Charing-Cross, hard by the way,
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Song: I prithee spare me gentle boy
I prithee spare me gentle boy,
Press me no more for that slight toy,
That foolish trifle of an heart;
I swear it will not do its part,
Though thou dost thine, employ’st thy pow’r and art.

For through long custom it has known
The little secrets, and is grown
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Song: If you refuse me once, and think again
If you refuse me once, and think again,
I will complain.
You are deceiv’d, love is no work of art,
It must be got and born,
Not made and worn,
By every one that hath a heart.

Or do you think they more than once can die,
Whom you deny?
Who tell you of a thousand deaths a day,
Like the old poets feign
And tell the pain
They met, but in the common way?

Or do you think ’t too soon to yield,
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Song: Out upon it, I have lov’d
Out upon it, I have lov’d
Three whole days together;
And am like to love three more,
If it prove fair weather.

Time shall moult away his wings,
Ere he shall discover
In the whole wide world again
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Song: Why so pale and wan fond lover?
Why so pale and wan fond lover?
Prithee why so pale?
Will, when looking well can’t move her,
Looking ill prevail?
Prithee why so pale?

Why so dull and mute young sinner?
Prithee why so mute?
Will, when speaking well can’t win her,
Saying nothing do’t?
Prithee why so mute?

Quit, quit for shame, this will not move,
This cannot take her;
If of herself she will not love,
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Sonnet 1: Dost see how unregarded now
Dost see how unregarded now
That piece of beauty passes?
There was a time when I did vow
To that alone;
But mark the fate of faces;
The red and white works now no more on me
Than if it could not charm, or I not see.
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Sonnet II: Of thee, kind boy, I ask no red and white
Of thee, kind boy, I ask no red and white,
To make up my delight;
No odd becoming graces,
Black eyes, or little know-not-whats in faces;
Make me but mad enough, give me good store
Of love for her I count;
I ask no more,
’Tis love in love that makes the sport.

There’s no such thing as that we beauty call,
It is mere cozenage all;
For though some, long ago,
Liked certain colors mingled so and so,
That doth not tie me now from choosing new;
If I a fancy take
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A Supplement of an Imperfect Copy of Verses of Mr. William Shakespear’s, by the Author
One of her hands one of her cheeks lay under,
Cosening the pillow of a lawful kiss,
Which therefore swell’d, and seem’d to part asunder,
As angry to be robb’d of such a bliss!
The one look’d pale and for revenge did long,
While t’other blush’d, ’cause it had done the wrong.

Out of the bed the other fair hand was
On a green satin quilt, whose perfect white
Look’d like a daisy in a field of grass,
And show’d like unmelt snow unto the sight;
There lay this pretty perdue, safe to keep
The rest o’ th’ body that lay fast asleep.

Her eyes (and therefore it was night), close laid
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Upon My Lady Carlisle’s Walking in Hampton Court Garden
DIALOGUE

T.C. J.S.

Thom.

Didst thou not find the place inspired,
And flowers, as if they had desired
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