From Maud: O that 'twere possible

F
O that ’twere possible
After long grief and pain
To find the arms of my true love
Round me once again!...

A shadow flits before me,
Not thou, but like to thee:
Ah, Christ! that it were possible
For one short hour to see
The souls we loved, that they might tell us
What and where they be!


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17-02-2024 18:13:53
This poem is a cry of the soul, full of longing and desire to see the loved one again. It reflects the deep pain and suffering experienced by the author after the loss of a close person. The poem is filled with emotions and hope that it is possible to see the loved one for just one short hour, to find out where they are and how they are feeling. The poem is an expression of deep love and longing felt by the author.

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