from To Priapus: Elegies 1.iv

f
Far from the tender Tribe of Boys remove,
For they’ve a thousand ways to kindle Love.
This, pleases as he strides the manag’d Horse,
And holds the taughten’d Rein with early Force;
This, as he swims, delights thy Fancy best,
Raising the smiling Wave with snowy Breast:
This, with a comely Look and manly Airs;
And that with Virgin Modesty ensnares.
But if at first you find him not inclin’d
To Love, have Patience, Time will change his Mind.

*

And you, what’er your Fav’rite does, approve,
For Condescension leads the Way to love.
Go with him where he goes, tho’ long the Way,
And the fierce Dog-star fires the sultry Day;
Or the gay Rainbow girds the bluish Sky,
And threatens rattling Show’rs of Rain are nigh.
If sailing on the Water by his Will,
Then steer the Wherry with a dext’rous Skill:
Nor think it hard Fatigues and Pains to bear,
But still be ready with a willing Cheer.
If he’ll inclose the Vales for savage Spoils,
Then on thy Shoulders bear the Nets and Toils;
If Fencing be the Fav’rite Sport he’ll use,
Take up the Files, and artlessly oppose;
Seem as intent, yet oft expose your Breast,
Neglect your Guard, and let him get the best;
Then he’ll be mild, then you a Kiss may seize,
He’ll struggle, but at length comply with ease;
Reluctant, tho’ at first you’ll find him grow
Ev’n fond, when round your Neck his Arms he’ll throw.

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