This World is not Conclusion (373)

T
This World is not Conclusion.
A Species stands beyond -
Invisible, as Music-
But positive, as Sound-
It beckons, and it baffles-
Philosophy, dont know-
And through a Riddle, at the last-
Sagacity, must go-
To guess it, puzzles scholars-
To gain it, Men have borne
Contempt of Generations
And Crucifixion, shown-
Faith slips-and laughs, and rallies-
Blushes, if any see-
Plucks at a twig of Evidence-
And asks a Vane, the way-
Much Gesture, from the Pulpit-
Strong Hallelujahs roll-
Narcotics cannot still the Tooth
That nibbles at the soul-
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