February

F
It is all kind of lovely that I know
what I attend here now the maturity of snow
has settled around forming a sort of time
pushing that other over either horizon and all is mine

in any colors to be chosen and
everything is cold and nothing is totally frozen

soon enough
the primary rough
erosion of what white fat it will occur
stiff yellows O
beautiful beautifully austere
be gotten down to, that much rash and achievement that
would promote to, but

now I know my own red
network electrifying this welcome annual hush.
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