The Cut

T
WELL, what's the matter ? there's a face
What ! has it cut a vein ?
And is it quite a shocking place ?
Come, let us look again.

I see it bleeds, but never mind
That tiny little drop ;
I don't believe you'll ever find
That crying makes it stop.

'Tis sad indeed to cry at pain,
For any but a baby ;
If that should chance to cut a vein,
We should not wonder, may be.

But such a man as you should try
To bear a little sorrow :
So run along, and wipe your eye,
'Twill all be well to-morrow.

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