Faces

F
I have seen a face with a thousand countenances, and a face thatwas but a single countenance as if held in a mould.

I have seen a face whose sheen I could look through to the uglinessbeneath, and a face whose sheen I had to lift to see how beautifulit was.

I have seen an old face much lined with nothing, and a smooth facein which all things were graven.

I know faces, because I look through the fabric my own eye weaves,and behold the reality beneath.
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