Modern Love: XLIX

M
He found her by the ocean’s moaning verge,
Nor any wicked change in her discerned;
And she believed his old love had returned,
Which was her exultation, and her scourge.
She took his hand, and walked with him, and seemed
The wife he sought, though shadow-like and dry.
She had one terror, lest her heart should sigh,
And tell her loudly that she no longer dreamed.
She dared not say, ‘This is my breast: look in.’
But there’s a strength to help the desperate weak.
That night he learned how silence best can speak
The awful things when Pity pleads for Sin.
About the middle of the night her call
Was heard, and he came wondering to the bed.
‘Now kiss me, dear! it may be, now!’ she said.
Lethe had passed those lips, and he knew all.

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