Oh, Fly

O
Oh, fly,
you flew
onto
my leaf
and not
my food.
What a relief!
For on my food
you'd bring me grief
as you're
a vector of
disease.
But you on leaf?
My mind's at ease.
And there is much
to please
my eye.
For oh, you are
a lovely fly.
Just
do not go
and multiply.
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