Cookie

C
Tonight's your lucky night, boys.
Look what I fixed for you!
Stood all day in the burning sun
to make this son-of-a-gun stew.

Longhorn steaks two inches thick,
dig in while they're hot.
The coffee'll keep you up all night,
belly up to the pot.

You know your Cookie loves you, boys,
loves to see you fed.
Stood all day in the burning sun
to bake this sourdough bread.

Sop up all the stew, boys,
take another steak.
Have another hunk of bread.
You know I love to bake.

You know your Cookie loves you, boys,
tell you what I'll do—
tomorrow I'll fix steak and bread
and a big old pot of stew!

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