Midwinter

M
All night I dreamed of roses,
Wild tangle by the sea,
And shadowy garden closes.
Dream-led I met with thee.

Around thee swayed the roses,
Beyond thee sang the sea;
The shadowy garden closes
Were Paradise to me.

O Love, ’mid the dream-roses
Abide to heal, to save!
The world that day discloses
Narrows to one white grave.
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