Saying Farewell at the Monastery after Hearing the Old Master Lecture on “Return to the Source”

S
At the last turn in the path
“goodbye—”
—bending, bowing,
(moss and a bit of
wild
bird-)
down.
Daitoku-ji Monastery

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