Upon the Vine-tree

U
XLV. Upon the Vine-tree.
What is the Vine, more than another Tree,
Nay most, than it, more tall, more comly be?
What Work-man thence will take a Beam or Pin,
To make ought which may be delighted in?
It's Excellency in it's Fruit doth lie.
A fruitless Vine! It is not worth a Fly.

Comparison.
What are Professors more than other men?
Nothing at all. Nay, there's not one in ten,
Either for Wealth, or Wit, that may compare,
In many things, with some that Carnal are.
Good are they, if they mortifie their Sin;
But without that they are not worth a Pin.

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