Today

T
from the First Villancico by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz
Written for the Nativity of Our Lord, Puebla, 1689. Since Love is shivering
in the ice and cold,
Read Poem
0
48
Rating:

Freedom by Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes
Freedom will not come
Today, this year
Nor ever
Through compromise and fear.

I have as much right
As the other fellow has
To stand
On my two feet
Read Poem
0
191
Rating:

In a Disused Graveyard by Robert Frost
Robert Frost
The living come with grassy tread
To read the gravestones on the hill;
The graveyard draws the living still,
But never any more the dead.

The verses in it say and say:
‘The ones who living come today
To read the stones and go away
Tomorrow dead will come to stay.’
Read Poem
0
43
Rating:

Spring and All: XIV Of death by William Carlos Williams
William Carlos Williams
Of death
the barber
the barber
talked to me

cutting my
life with
sleep to trim
my hair —
Read Poem
0
38
Rating:

Let America Be America Again by Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes

Let America be America again.
Let it be the dream it used to be.
Let it be the pioneer on the plain
Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed—
Let it be that great strong land of love
Read Poem
0
49
Rating:

Sonnet for 1950 by Jack Agüeros
Jack Agüeros
All the kids came rumbling down the wood tenement
Shaky stairs, sneakers slapping against the worn
Tin tread edges, downhall came Pepo, Chino, Cojo,
Curly bursting from the door like shells exploding
Singing "I'm a Rican Doodle Dandy" and "What shall
We be today, Doctors or Junkies, Soldiers or Winos?"

Pepo put a milk crate on a Spanish Harlem johnny pump
And drops opened like paratroopers carrying war news.
Read Poem
0
45
Rating:

The Fox by Kahlil Gibran
Kahlil Gibran
A fox looked at his shadow at sunrise and said, “I will have
a camel for lunch today.” And all morning he went about looking
for camels. But at noon he saw his shadow again—and he said, “A
mouse will do.”
Read Poem
0
42
Rating:

The Good God and the Evil God by Kahlil Gibran
Kahlil Gibran
The Good God and the Evil God met on the mountain top.

The Good God said, “Good day to you, brother.”

The Evil God did not answer.

And the Good God said, “You are in a bad humour today.”

“Yes,” said the Evil God, “for of late I have been often mistakenfor you, called by your name, and treated as if I were you, and itill-pleases me.”

And the Good God said, “But I too have been mistaken for you andcalled by your name.”

The Evil God walked away cursing the stupidity of man.
Read Poem
0
42
Rating:

Todtnauberg by Paul Celan
Paul Celan
Arnica, eyebright, the
draft from the well with the
star-die on top,

in the
Hütte,

written in the book
—whose name did it record
before mine?—,
Read Poem
0
43
Rating:

Where am I by Paul Celan
Paul Celan
Where am I
today?

The dangers, all,
with their appliance,
hickishly gamey,

pitchfork-high
the heavensfallow hoisted,

the losses, chalkmouthed—you
Read Poem
0
40
Rating:

The Falling Leaves by Margaret Postgate Cole
Margaret Postgate Cole
November 1915 Today, as I rode by,
I saw the brown leaves dropping from their tree
In a still afternoon,
When no wind whirled them whistling to the sky,
Read Poem
0
32
Rating:

Sonnet 13 by John Berryman
John Berryman
I lift—lift you five States away your glass,
Wide of this bar you never graced, where none
Ever I know came, where what work is done
Even by these men I know not, where a brass
Police-car sign peers in, wet strange cars pass,
Soiled hangs the rag of day out over this town,
A juke-box brains air where I drink alone,
The spruce barkeep sports a toupee alas—
Read Poem
0
36
Rating:

Out of Water by Marie Ponsot
Marie Ponsot
A new embroidery of flowers, canary color,
dots the grass already dotty
with aster-white and clover.

I warn, “They won’t last, out of water.”
The children pick some anyway.

In or out of  water
children don’t last either.

I watch them as they pick.
Still free of  what’s next
and what was yesterday
they pick today.
Read Poem
0
33
Rating:

Today We Fly by Curzio Malaparte
Curzio Malaparte
One Sunday morning,
instead of studying The Illiad,
I escaped with Bino to Florence,
to see what miracles the aviator Manissero
would perform.

Whether he would demonstrate the art of Daedalus
or the folly of Icarus.

We found the whole city festooned with banners
Read Poem
0
45
Rating:

44th Birthday Evening, at Harris’s by Ted Berrigan
Ted Berrigan
Nine stories high Second Avenue
On the roof there’s a party
All the friends are there watching
By the light of the moon the blazing sun
Go down over the side of the planet
To light up the underside of Earth
There are long bent telescopes for the friends
To watch this through. The friends are all in shadow.
Read Poem
0
31
Rating:

The Girls of Winter by Jim Harrison
Jim Harrison
Out the window of the bar I’m watching
a circle of girls stretching and yawning
across the street. It’s late January and 74
degrees. They love the heat because
they are a moist heat. Heat loves
heat and today is a tease for what comes
with spring around here when the glorious birds
funnel back up from Mexico. The girls
don’t care about birds because they are birds.
I recall in high school a half dozen
cheerleaders resting on a wrestling mat
in short shorts in the gym, me beside them
with a silly groin ache. What were they?
Living, lovely, warm meat as we all are
reaching out of our bodies for someone else.
Read Poem
0
48
Rating:

Circle Poems by Lew Welch
Lew Welch
Whenever I have a day off, I write a new poem.
Does this mean you shouldn’t work, or that you
write best on your day off?

For example, this is the poem I wrote today.


*


When he was 20, he understood some of the secrets of
life, and undertook to write them down so simply that
even an idiot could understand.
Read Poem
0
55
Rating:

Bright Day by Stanley Moss
Stanley Moss
I sing this morning: Hello, hello.
I proclaim the bright day of the soul.
The sun is a good fellow,
the devil is a good guy, no deaths today I know.
I live because I live. I do not die because I cannot die.
In Tuscan sunlight Masaccio
painted his belief that St. Peter’s shadow
cured a cripple, gave him back his sight.
Read Poem
0
32
Rating:

The Country Autumns by Clark Coolidge
Clark Coolidge
But it could not be brought to see what it
could be brought. And the leaves are
away again, teamed. A parent at the
last and a parent in the middle. And
as stones I thought it right.

Two plates, and on the other side all the
forest pieces. The clock says stay.
The books lower the earth, and in gardens
Read Poem
0
34
Rating:

A History Without Suffering by E. A. Markham
E. A. Markham
In this poem there is no suffering.
It spans hundreds of years and records
no deaths, connecting when it can,
those moments where people are healthy

Read Poem
0
48
Rating:

The Spoilsport by Robert Graves
Robert Graves
My familiar ghost again
Comes to see what he can see,
Critic, son of Conscious Brain,
Spying on our privacy.

Slam the window, bolt the door,
Yet he’ll enter in and stay;
In to-morrow’s book he’ll score
Indiscretions of to-day.

Whispered love and muttered fears,
How their echoes fly about!
None escape his watchful ears,
Every sigh might be a shout.

Read Poem
0
29
Rating:

The Consent by Howard Nemerov
Howard Nemerov
Late in November, on a single night
Not even near to freezing, the ginkgo trees
That stand along the walk drop all their leaves
In one consent, and neither to rain nor to wind
But as though to time alone: the golden and green
Leaves litter the lawn today, that yesterday
Had spread aloft their fluttering fans of light.

What signal from the stars? What senses took it in?
Read Poem
0
38
Rating:

Today by Daniel G. Hoffman
Daniel G. Hoffman
Today the sun rose, as it used to do
When its mission was to shine on you.
Since in unrelenting dark you're gone,
What now can be the purpose of  the sun?
Read Poem
0
39
Rating:

little report of the day by Jack Collom
Jack Collom
9:13 p.m., Lucky Bock in hand,
I inscribe: walked the lovely
33 blocks to school today, streets clear and
thick melting snow all around.
taught my 4 hours of poetry; the afternoon
class was hard; kid named Schweikert
kept on fucking up. took typed-up
poems of yesterday to Platt and put up
Read Poem
0
38
Rating:

Expression by George Arnold
George Arnold
A hackneyed burden, to a hackneyed air,—
“I love thee only,—thou art wondrous fair!”
Alas! the poets have worn the theme threadbare!

Can I not find some words less tame and old,
To paint thy form and face of perfect mould,
Thy dewy lips, thy hair of brown and gold?

Can I not sing in somewhat fresher strain
The love I lavish and receive again,—
The thrilling joy, so like to thrilling pain?

Can I not, by some metaphor divine,
Describe the life I quaff like nectared wine
In being thine, and knowing thou art mine?
Read Poem
0
35
Rating:

Before I got my eye put out – (336) by Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson
Before I got my eye put out –
I liked as well to see
As other creatures, that have eyes –
And know no other way –

But were it told to me, Today,
That I might have the Sky
For mine, I tell you that my Heart
Would split, for size of me –
Read Poem
0
38
Rating:

Poor Crow! by Mary Mapes Dodge
Mary Mapes Dodge
Give me something to eat,
Good people, I pray;
I have really not had
One mouthful today!

I am hungry and cold,
And last night I dreamed
A scarecrow had caught me—
Good land, how I screamed!

Of one little children
And six ailing wives
(No, one wife and six children),
Not one of them thrives.

Read Poem
0
42
Rating:

Success is counted sweetest (112) by Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson
Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne'er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.

Not one of all the purple Host
Who took the Flag today
Can tell the definition
So clear of victory
Read Poem
0
37
Rating:

Remember by Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes
Remember
The days of bondage—
And remembering—
Do not stand still.
Go to the highest hill
And look down upon the town
Where you are yet a slave.
Look down upon any town in Carolina
Read Poem
0
45
Rating:

Commemoration by Samuel Menashe
Samuel Menashe
Old as I am
This candle I light
For you today
May be the last one
Of your afterlife
With me, your son—
With me you die twice.
Read Poem
0
44
Rating:

Danny Deever by Rudyard Kipling
Rudyard Kipling
‘What are the bugles blowin’ for?' said Files-on-Parade.
‘To turn you out, to turn you out,’ the Colour-Sergeant said.
‘What makes you look so white, so white?’ said Files-on-Parade.
‘I’m dreadin’ what I’ve got to watch,’ the Colour-Sergeant said.
For they’re hangin’ Danny Deever, you can hear the Dead March play,
The Regiment’s in ’ollow square—they’re hangin’ him to-day;
They’ve taken of his buttons off an’ cut his stripes away,
An’ they're hangin’ Danny Deever in the mornin’.
Read Poem
0
37
Rating:

Encounter by Czeslaw Milosz
Czeslaw Milosz
We were riding through frozen fields in a wagon at dawn.
A red wing rose in the darkness.

And suddenly a hare ran across the road.
One of us pointed to it with his hand.

That was long ago. Today neither of them is alive,
Not the hare, nor the man who made the gesture.

O my love, where are they, where are they going
The flash of a hand, streak of movement, rustle of pebbles.
Read Poem
0
33
Rating:

A Lay of the Links by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
It’s up and away from our work to-day,
For the breeze sweeps over the down;
And it’s hey for a game where the gorse blossoms flame,
And the bracken is bronzing to brown.
With the turf ’neath our tread and the blue overhead,
And the song of the lark in the whin;
There’s the flag and the green, with the bunkers between—
Now will you be over or in?

The doctor may come, and we’ll teach him to know
A tee where no tannin can lurk;
The soldier may come, and we’ll promise to show
Some hazards a soldier may shirk;
The statesman may joke, as he tops every stroke,
That at last he is high in his aims;
Read Poem
0
35
Rating:

My Erotic Double by John Ashbery
John Ashbery
He says he doesn’t feel like working today.
It’s just as well. Here in the shade
Behind the house, protected from street noises,
One can go over all kinds of old feeling,
Throw some away, keep others.
The wordplay
Between us gets very intense when there are
Fewer feelings around to confuse things.
Read Poem
0
47
Rating:

Ode by Henry Timrod
Henry Timrod
Sung on the occasion of decorating the graves of the Confederate dead, at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S. C., 1866 Sleep sweetly in your humble graves,
Sleep, martyrs of a fallen cause!—
Read Poem
0
41
Rating:

The Old Codger’s Lament by Carl Rakosi
Carl Rakosi
Who can say now,
“When I was young, the country was very beautiful?
Oaks and willows grew along the rivers
and there were many herbs and flowering bushes.
The forests were so dense the deer slipped through
the cottonwoods and maples unseen.”

Who would listen?
Who will carry even the vicarious tone of that time?
Read Poem
0
39
Rating:

On the Pulse of Morning by Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
A Rock, A River, A Tree
Hosts to species long since departed,
Marked the mastodon,
The dinosaur, who left dried tokens
Of their sojourn here
On our planet floor,
Any broad alarm of their hastening doom
Is lost in the gloom of dust and ages.
Read Poem
0
34
Rating:

Return to Rome by Stanley Moss
Stanley Moss
Today in Rome, heading down
Michelangelo’s Spanish Steps,
under an unchanging moon,
I held on to the balustrade,
grateful for his giving me a hand.
All for love, I stumbled over the past
as if it were my own feet. Here, in my twenties,
I was lost in love and poetry. Along the Tiber,
Read Poem
0
32
Rating:

Seaman’s Ditty by Gary Snyder
Gary Snyder
I’m wondering where you are now
Married, or mad, or free:
Wherever you are you’re likely glad,
But memory troubles me.

We could’ve had us children,
We could’ve had a home—
But you thought not, and I thought not,
And these nine years we roam.
Read Poem
0
34
Rating:

Songs from The Beggar’s Opera: Air IV-Cotillion by John Gay
John Gay
Act II, Scene iv, Air IV—Cotillion Youth’s the season made for joys,
Love is then our duty:
Read Poem
0
37
Rating:

Sonnet 21: Cyriack, whose grandsire on the royal bench by John Milton
John Milton
Cyriack, whose grandsire on the royal bench
Of British Themis, with no mean applause,
Pronounced, and in his volumes taught, our laws,
Which others at their bar so often wrench,
Today deep thoughts resolve with me to drench
In mirth that after no repenting draws;
Let Euclid rest, and Archimedes pause,
And what the Swede intend, and what the French.
To measure life learn thou betimes, and know
Toward solid good what leads the nearest way;
For other things mild Heaven a time ordains,
And disapproves that care, though wise in show,
That with superfluous burden loads the day,
And, when God sends a cheerful hour, refrains.
Read Poem
0
44
Rating:

To a Dead Lover by Louise Bogan
Louise Bogan
The dark is thrown
Back from the brightness, like hair
Cast over a shoulder.
I am alone,

Four years older;
Like the chairs and the walls
Which I once watched brighten
With you beside me. I was to waken
Never like this, whatever came or was taken.

The stalk grows, the year beats on the wind.
Apples come, and the month for their fall.
The bark spreads, the roots tighten.
Though today be the last
Read Poem
0
37
Rating:

To Catullus by Robert Bridges
Robert Bridges
Would that you were alive today, Catullus!
Truth ’tis, there is a filthy skunk amongst us,
A rank musk-idiot, the filthiest skunk,
Of no least sorry use on earth, but only
Fit in fancy to justify the outlay
Of your most horrible vocabulary.

My Muse, all innocent as Eve in Eden,
Would yet wear any skins of old pollution
Rather than celebrate the name detested.
Ev’n now might he rejoice at our attention,
Guess'd he this little ode were aiming at him.

O! were you but alive again, Catullus!

Read Poem
0
28
Rating:

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time by Robert Herrick
Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.

The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he’s a-getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
Read Poem
0
42
Rating:

Variations on a Text by Vallejo by Donald Justice
Donald Justice
Me moriré en Paris con aguacero ... I will die in Miami in the sun,
On a day when the sun is very bright,
Read Poem
0
36
Rating:

Waiting for the Barbarians by C. P. Cavafy
C. P. Cavafy
What are we waiting for, assembled in the forum?

The barbarians are due here today.


Why isn’t anything going on in the senate?
Why are the senators sitting there without legislating?

Because the barbarians are coming today.
What’s the point of senators making laws now?
Once the barbarians are here, they’ll do the legislating.


Why did our emperor get up so early,
Read Poem
0
35
Rating:

What the Leaf Told Me by Ronald Johnson
Ronald Johnson
Today I saw the word written on the poplar leaves.

It was ‘dazzle’. The dazzle of the poplars.


As a leaf startles out


from an undifferentiated mass of foliage,

so the word did from a leaf—


A Mirage Of The Delicate Polyglot

inventing itself as cipher. But this, in shifts & gyrations,

grew in brightness, so bright
Read Poem
0
33
Rating:

Response to the Loyalty Oath by Jack Spicer
Jack Spicer
We, the Research Assistants and Teaching Assistants of the University of California, wish to register our protest against the new loyalty oath for the following reasons.

1) The testing of a University faculty by oath is a stupid and insulting procedure. If this oath is to have the effect of eliminating Communists from the faculty, we might as logically eliminate murderers from the faculty by forcing every faculty member to sign an oath saying that he has never committed murder.

2) That such an oath is more dangerous to the liberties of the community than any number of active Communists should be obvious to any student of history. Liberty and democracy are more often overthrown by fear than by stealth. Only countries such as Russia or Spain have institutions so weak and unhealthy that they must be protected by terror.

3) Oaths and other forms of blackmail are destructive to the free working of man's intellect. Since the early Middle Ages universities have zealously guarded their intellectual freedom and have made use of its power to help create the world we know today. The oath that Galileo was forced by the Inquisition to swear is but a distant cousin to the oath we are asked to swear today, but both represent the struggle of the blind and powerful against the minds of free men.

We, who will inherit the branches of learning that one thousand years of free universities have helped to generate, are not Communists and dislike the oath for the same reason we dislike Communism. Both breed stupidity and indignity; both threaten our personal and intellectual freedom.
[c. 1949]
Read Poem
0
38
Rating:

Black Stone on a White Stone by César Vallejo
César Vallejo
I will die in Paris with a rainstorm,
on a day I already remember,
I will die in Paris—and I don't shy away—
perhaps on a Thursday, as today is, in autumn.

It will be Thursday, because today, Thursday, as I prose
these lines, I've put on my humeri in a bad mood,
and, today like never before, I've turned back,
with all of my road, to see myself alone.
Read Poem
0
29
Rating:

Balm in Gilead by Grace Schulman
Grace Schulman
“Is there no balm in Gilead?” So cries
dour Jeremiah in granite tones.
“There is a balm in Gilead,” replies
a Negro spiritual. The baritone

who chants it, leaning forward on the platform,
looks up, not knowing his voice is a rainstorm
that rinses air to reveal earth’s surprises.
Today, the summer gone, four monarch butterflies,
Read Poem
0
46
Rating:

Burning Island by Gary Snyder
Gary Snyder
O Wave Godwho broke through me today
Sea Bream
massive pink and silver
cool swimming down with me watching
staying away from the spear

Volcano belly Keeper who lifted this island
for our own beaded bodies adornment
and sprinkles us all with his laugh—
Read Poem
0
36
Rating:

Concord Hymn by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Sung at the Completion of the Battle Monument, July 4, 1837 By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Read Poem
0
35
Rating:

For the Anniversary of My Death by W. S. Merwin
W. S. Merwin
Every year without knowing it I have passed the day
When the last fires will wave to me
And the silence will set out
Tireless traveler
Like the beam of a lightless star

Then I will no longer
Find myself in life as in a strange garment
Surprised at the earth
Read Poem
0
46
Rating:

The House on the Hill by Edwin Arlington Robinson
Edwin Arlington Robinson
They are all gone away,
The House is shut and still,
There is nothing more to say.

Through broken walls and gray
The winds blow bleak and shrill:
They are all gone away.
Read Poem
0
37
Rating:

Humoresque by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Edna St. Vincent Millay
"Heaven bless the babe," they said.
"What queer books she must have read!"
(Love, by whom I was beguiled,
Grant I may not bear a child!)

"Little does she guess today
What the world may be," they say.
(Snow, drift deep and cover
Till the spring my murdered lover!)
Read Poem
0
39
Rating:

I Left My Head by Lilian Moore
Lilian Moore
I left my head
somewhere
today.
Put it down for
just
a minute.
Under the
table?
Read Poem
0
42
Rating:

In Harvest by Sophie Jewett
Sophie Jewett
Mown meadows skirt the standing wheat;
I linger, for the hay is sweet,
New-cut and curing in the sun.
Like furrows, straight, the windrows run,
Fallen, gallant ranks that tossed and bent
When, yesterday, the west wind went
A-rioting through grass and grain.
To-day no least breath stirs the plain;
Read Poem
0
32
Rating:

In Memoriam A. H. H. OBIIT MDCCCXXXIII: 99 by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Risest thou thus, dim dawn, again,
So loud with voices of the birds,
So thick with lowings of the herds,
Day, when I lost the flower of men;

Who tremblest thro' thy darkling red
On yon swoll'n brook that bubbles fast
By meadows breathing of the past,
And woodlands holy to the dead;

Who murmurest in the foliaged eaves
A song that slights the coming care,
And Autumn laying here and there
A fiery finger on the leaves;

Read Poem
0
36
Rating:

Irony by Louis Untermeyer
Louis Untermeyer
Why are the things that have no death
The ones with neither sight nor breath!
Eternity is thrust upon
A bit of earth, a senseless stone.
A grain of dust, a casual clod
Receives the greatest gift of God.
A pebble in the roadway lies—
It never dies.
Read Poem
0
33
Rating:

Languages by Carl Sandburg
Carl Sandburg
THERE are no handles upon a language
Whereby men take hold of it
And mark it with signs for its remembrance.
It is a river, this language,
Once in a thousand years
Breaking a new course
Changing its way to the ocean.
It is mountain effluvia
Moving to valleys
And from nation to nation
Crossing borders and mixing.
Languages die like rivers.
Words wrapped round your tongue today
And broken to shape of thought
Between your teeth and lips speaking
Read Poem
0
39
Rating:

Maybe It’s Only the Monotony by Gail Mazur
Gail Mazur
of these long scorching days
but today my daughter
is truly exasperating—
Stop it! I shout—or I’ll—
and I twist her little pinked arm
slowly,
calibrating my ferocity—

You can’t hurt me you can’t hurt me!
Read Poem
0
31
Rating:

Mutability "The flower that smiles to-day" by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Percy Bysshe Shelley
The flower that smiles to-day
To-morrow dies;
All that we wish to stay
Tempts and then flies.
What is this world's delight?
Lightning that mocks the night,
Brief even as bright.

Virtue, how frail it is!
Friendship how rare!
Love, how it sells poor bliss
For proud despair!
But we, though soon they fall,
Survive their joy, and all
Which ours we call.
Read Poem
0
41
Rating:

A Penitent Considers Another Coming of Mary by Gwendolyn Brooks
Gwendolyn Brooks
For Reverend Theodore Richardson If Mary came would Mary
Forgive, as Mothers may,
Read Poem
0
38
Rating:

Proust’s Madeleine by Kenneth Rexroth
Kenneth Rexroth
Somebody has given my
Baby daughter a box of
Old poker chips to play with.
Today she hands me one while
I am sitting with my tired
Brain at my desk. It is red.
On it is a picture of
An elk’s head and the letters
Read Poem
0
41
Rating:

September, 1918 by Amy Lowell
Amy Lowell
This afternoon was the colour of water falling through sunlight;
The trees glittered with the tumbling of leaves;
The sidewalks shone like alleys of dropped maple leaves,
And the houses ran along them laughing out of square, open windows.
Under a tree in the park,
Two little boys, lying flat on their faces,
Were carefully gathering red berries
To put in a pasteboard box.
Read Poem
0
33
Rating:

A Shropshire Lad 31: On Wenlock Edge the wood's in trouble by A. E. Housman
A. E. Housman
On Wenlock Edge the wood's in trouble;
His forest fleece the Wrekin heaves;
The gale, it plies the saplings double,
And thick on Severn snow the leaves.

'Twould blow like this through holt and hanger
When Uricon the city stood:
'Tis the old wind in the old anger,
But then it threshed another wood.

Then, 'twas before my time, the Roman
At yonder heaving hill would stare:
The blood that warms an English yeoman,
The thoughts that hurt him, they were there.

Read Poem
0
37
Rating:

Song by W. D. Snodgrass
W. D. Snodgrass
Observe the cautious toadstools
still on the lawn today
though they grow over-evening;
sun shrinks them away.
Pale and proper and rootless,
they righteously extort
their living from the living.
I have been their sort.
Read Poem
0
40
Rating:

The Twins by Robert W. Service
Robert W. Service
There were two brothers, John and James,
And when the town went up in flames,
To save the house of James dashed John,
Then turned, and lo! his own was gone.

And when the great World War began,
To volunteer John promptly ran;
And while he learned live bombs to lob,
James stayed at home and—sneaked his job.
Read Poem
0
36
Rating:

What the Sexton Said by Vachel Lindsay
Vachel Lindsay
Your dust will be upon the wind
Within some certain years,
Though you be sealed in lead to-day
Amid the country’s tears.

When this idyllic churchyard
Becomes the heart of town,
The place to build garage or inn,
They’ll throw your tombstone down.

Your name so dim, so long outworn,
Your bones so near to earth,
Your sturdy kindred dead and gone,
How should men know your worth?

Read Poem
0
33
Rating:

Young Afrikans by Gwendolyn Brooks
Gwendolyn Brooks
of the furious


Who take Today and jerk it out of joint
have made new underpinnings and a Head.

Blacktime is time for chimeful
poemhood
but they decree a
jagged chiming now.

If there are flowers flowers
Read Poem
0
44
Rating: