Frederick Goddard Tuckerman

F
Frederick Goddard Tuckerman
“And Change, with hurried hand, has swept these scenes”
from Sonnets, Second Series

XVIII

And Change, with hurried hand, has swept these scenes:
The woods have fallen; across the meadow-lot
The hunter’s trail and trap-path is forgot;
And fire has drunk the swamps of evergreens!
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“How oft in schoolboy-days, from the school’s sway”
from Sonnets, Second Series

XXIX

How oft in schoolboy-days, from the school’s sway
Have I run forth to Nature as to a friend,—
With some pretext of o’erwrought sight, to spend
My school-time in green meadows far away!
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42
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“How well do I recall that walk in state”
from Sonnets, Third Series

V

How well do I recall that walk in state
Across the Common, by the paths we knew:
Myself in silver badge and riband blue,
My little sister with her book and slate;
The elm tree by the Pond, the fence of wood,
The burial place that at the corner stood
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“Roll on, sad world! not Mercury or Mars”
from Sonnets, Second Series

XVII

Roll on, sad world! not Mercury or Mars
Could swifter speed, or slower, round the sun,
Than in this year of variance thou hast done
For me. Yet pain, fear, heart-break, woes, and wars
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“Thin little leaves of wood fern, ribbed and toothed”
from Sonnets, Third Series

IV

Thin little leaves of wood fern, ribbed and toothed,
Long curved sail needles of the green pitch pine,
With common sandgrass, skirt the horizon line,
And over these the incorruptible blue!
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“Yet, even ’mid merry boyhood’s tricks and scapes”
from Sonnets, Second Series

XXX

Yet, even ‘mid merry boyhood’s tricks and scapes,
Early my heart a deeper lesson learnt;
Wandering alone by many a mile burnt
Black woodside, that but the snow-flake decks and drapes.
And I have stood beneath Canadian sky,
In utter solitudes, where the cricket’s cry
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“Dank fens of cedar; hemlock-branches gray”
from Sonnets, First Series

VI

Dank fens of cedar; hemlock-branches gray
With trees and trail of mosses, wringing-wet;
Beds of the black pitchpine in dead leaves set
Whose wasted red has wasted to white away;
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