Divine Epigrams: To our Lord, upon the Water Made Wine

D
Thou water turn’st to wine, fair friend of life,
Thy foe, to cross the sweet arts of thy reign,
Distils from thence the tears of wrath and strife,
And so turns wine to water back again.
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