Contentment

C
No harm would I pose
To the bee in its hive
To the bird in its nest;
I live in my own world
Under my hat.
It is my contentment that makes
Me smile without reason on the streets;
It is my heart,
The source of this raving frenzy.
I am not silent, I can’t keep quiet
Like the dead beneath the dirt
In the midst of this sweet world.
Translated from the Turkish

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