What the Leaf Told Me

W
Today I saw the word written on the poplar leaves.

It was dazzle’. The dazzle of the poplars.


As a leaf startles out


from an undifferentiated mass of foliage,

so the word did from a leaf—


A Mirage Of The Delicate Polyglot

inventing itself as cipher. But this, in shifts & gyrations,

grew in brightness, so bright


the massy poplars soon outshone the sun . . .


‘My light—my dew—my breeze—my bloom’. Reflections


In A Wren’s Eye.


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