"How can I keep my maidenhead"

"
How can I keep my maidenhead,
My maidenhead, my maidenhead;
How can I keep my maidenhead,
Among sae mony men, O.

The Captain bad a guinea for’t,
A guinea for’t, a guinea for’t,
The Captain bad a guinea for’t,
The Colonel he bad ten, O.

But I’ll do as my minnie did,
My minnie did, my minnie did,
But I’ll do as my minnie did,
For siller I’ll hae nane, O.

I’ll gie it to a bonie lad,
A bonie lad, a bonie lad;
I’ll gie it to a bonie lad,
For just as gude again, O.

An auld moulie maidenhead,
A maidenhead, a maidenhead;
An auld moulie maidenhead,
The weary wark I ken, O.

The stretchin’ o’t, the strivin’ o’t,
The borin o’t, the rivin’ o’t,
And ay the double drivin o’t,
The farther ye gang ben, O.

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